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A backpack and a bag, each equipped with PALS, stand side by side and the connecting surfaces can be seen.

How to attach MOLLE / PALS pouches?

PALS (Pouch Attachment Ladder System) is a system for attaching personal equipment. It was developed for the MOLLE (Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment) carrying system and is used in both the military and civilian sectors (e.g. for work clothing). The term "MOLLE" is often used colloquially even when strictly speaking it actually means "PALS".

This is a step-by-step guide on how to attach a PALS pouch to a carrier system.

In this specific case, the zipper pocket M is attached to the deployment backpack Standard. However, this example can also be applied to any other bag equipped with PALS. The MOLLE / PAL system is a standard that is manufacturer-independent. Thus, tactical equipment from other manufacturers can also be combined with that from Zentauron.

Thanks to the Zentauron Faststick system, the attachment is simple and does not require any additional components such as snaps, buckles or the like.

The straps on the back of the bag are pulled through the first strap loop of the backpack.

1. Prepare and use first strap loop on carrier

As preparation, place the bag on the carrier on a trial basis and determine where the bag is to be attached. Here it is important to ensure that there are still enough straps on the carrier for a secure connection.

The two straps on the back of the bag must now be pulled through the first strap loop on the carrier. Depending on the type of bag, this corresponds approximately to the later upper edge of the bag on the carrier.

The bag is connected to the first loop, the straps are tightened.

2. Tighten straps

Tighten the two straps so that the bag is firmly attached to the carrier.

Webbing is passed through the first loop on the pouch.

3. Pass webbing through the first loop on the pouch

Feed the two webbing straps back through the webbing of the pouch. Again, tighten the webbing at the end. The webbing is braided in, so to speak.

The webbing of the pouch is pulled through the second loops on the backpack.

4. Use the next loops on the carrier

The first connection is made, now the webbing is again passed through the loops on the carrier and tightened again.

The webbing of the pouch is pulled through the second loops on the bag.

5. Pass webbing through the next loops on the pouch

Same principle as in step 3, only with the second loop on the pouch.

The webbing of the pouch is pulled through the second loops on the backpack.

6. Use the next loops on the carrier

As in step 4, pull the webbing through the next loop on the carrier.

The webbing of the pouch is pushed through all the loops on the pouch.

7. Push webbing through all loops of the pouch

When the webbing has been passed through all the loops on the carrier side, the end of the webbing is finally pushed through all the loops on the pouch side. This gives the connection the necessary hold and prevents it from coming loose on its own.

The bag is fully connected to the backpack by means of the PAL system.

8. The pouch is fully connected to the carrier

The pouch has now been interwoven with the backpack, making it sturdily attached.

The Zentauron Zipper Bag M is attached to the Zentauron Einsatzrucksack Standard by means of the PALS

Universal connection through MOLLE / PALS

Most of the bags and carrying systems are connected via this system and can thus be flexibly combined with each other in a wide variety of ways.

Examples of carrier systems

  • Plate Carrier
  • Protective vest
  • Backpack
  • Chest Rig
  • Battle Belt

Examples of pouches

  • Military pouches like multipurpose bags and accessories bags
  • Magazine pouches, magazine panels and ammunition pouches as used by military and police forces
  • Medic pouches such as IFAK Pouches and bags for tourniquets for first aid and emergency medicine
  • Radio equipment pouches for communication
  • Admin Pouch and organizer for maps, writing pads, GPS device and smartphones